I Heart Aussie YA #3

I am featuring Australian YA books so I can convince teens of Australia to give them a go. Heck, readers don’t have to be teens – or even Australian for that matter.

Title:  Life In Outer Space
Author: Melissa Keil
Publisher: Hardie Grant Egmont
Genre: YA Contemporary Romance

Melissa Keil’s Life In Outer Space is one of my favourite Aussie YA books. I loved this book so much that I’m already imagining myself going back for a re-read. I finished reading it just before bed but didn’t want to go to sleep and lose all the ‘warm and fuzzies’ it gave me.

Keil’s writing makes every situation real – I kept pausing throughout the book to reflect on all the people I know who could actually be those characters.

Not being a boy, I don’t really know how accurate Sam’s POV narration was but to my limited expertise he was spot on. His teenage male cluelessness about girls was perfect. Camilla’s cool charm and self-assuredness made me adore her and wish I could have been her when I was at school.

This book made me laugh – not something I do very often whilst reading. It has some of the funniest lines I’ve ever read. Keil’s writing style is delightfully funny and absolutely real.

Title:    The Incredible Adventures of Cinnamon Girl
Author:  Melissa Keil
Publisher:  Hardie Grant Egmont
Genre: YA Contemporary Romance

The familiarity of Keil’s characters quickly transported me. These were characters I’m certain have walked through my life at some stage. Keil has captured the timeless struggle of those finishing school and casting their eyes towards the next great life adventure. The excitement and dread of life irrevocably changing regardless of whether or not you want it to.

Like Life in Outer Space, TIAoCG was an easy read. It was like snuggling up in your favourite trackies – warm, comfy and safe. It felt as though my teenage years were giving me a hug.

This second offering proves she is an author with flair and one whose career I will be following with anticipation.

Try these books if you liked Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell or Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins.

Advertisements

I Heart Aussie YA #2

I am featuring Australian YA books so I can convince teens of Australia to give them a go. Heck, readers don’t have to be teens – or even Australian for that matter.

Title                             Liberated (Book three in The Guardians Series)
Author                        MJ Stevens
Publisher                   Self Published

Liberated_CoverFront_Proof2

Last Christmas I was lucky enough to receive a copy of Liberated by MJ Stevens in exchange for an honest review. Aside from the joy of receiving books in the mail (is there anything better?) I was keen to discover what fate would befall Mellea in this final instalment of The Guardian Series.

I do adore stories about the average girl being swept into a royal world. There’s excitement, there’s nerves, there’s passion – what’s not to love? Books one and two in this series gave all that and hooked me in.

Similarities exist between MJ Stevens’ The Guardian Series and Marrisa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles. Both explore the reactions of society to those whose bodies have been mechanically altered to be stronger, faster, better. In the Lunar Chronicles, these people are called cyborgs. In The Guardian Series, they are MECHS. Both are shunned by society but, unlike Myer’s lead, Cinder, Stevens’ central protagonist in Mellea – an everyday small town girl who is thrust into the prestigious world of the ruling elite.

The final book in the series, Liberated, focuses on the building conflict between the MECHS, the Guardians and the ever changing, ever evil, Doctor. The people of Poridos are losing faith in the Guardians’ ability to protect them from the MECHS. Villages are being wiped out and confidence in the ruling elite is at an all time low. Threats on the Guardian’s lives are happening all to often. Mellea must navigate this new climate all the while learning how to be part of the Successor’s world.

The book explores the dangers of giving religious extremists a voice, acceptance and intolerance and of course, trying to find your place in the world. It’s a strong end to the series. It answers all the questions and takes some unexpected turns. The only area in this book that didn’t live up to the previous two was the development of the relationship between Mellea and Leo. I loved in the first two books how their trust in each other grew and the steps they took back and forth towards a caring relationship. In Liberated, the relationship took second place to all the drama and action the Guardians were facing. Okay, that may seem like a real-life reasonable thing to happen but I wanted to experience how that could relationship grow further. I wanted to see how Leo continued to struggle with his image, his role as a Successor and work out how to be a boyfriend. I admit it – I wanted more swoon!

The verdict? This makes the list of Aussie YA to check out. If you haven’t already, add the first book in the series, Bound, to your TBR.

Try this book if you liked The Selection Series and the Lunar Chronicles.

I Heart Aussie YA # 1

I am featuring Australian YA books so I can convince teens of Australia to give them a go. Heck, readers don’t have to be teens – or even Australian for that matter.

Title                                             State of Grace
Author                                         Hilary Badger
Publisher                                    Hardie Grant Egmont
Genre                                          YA Dystopia

9781760120382

There’s something exciting about delving into a novel you have know nothing about. State of Grace by Hilary Badger is published in Australia by Hardie Grant Egmont. That and the gorgeous launch party pics posted on the HGE twitter feed were all I had to go on. Knowing HGE are responsible for the publication of works such as Melissa’s Kiel’s Life in Outer Space and Erin Gough’s The Flywheel, I knew there had to be something special about it.

And there is. It is different. Part dystoian, part utopian, State of Grace explores perceptions of happiness and the lengths we will go to ensure a life of joy. Straight away, we are thrust into the world of Wren, where everything is completely perfect, dotly if you will. But why is it perfect? Why does it need to be? What is the perfection and joy hiding? These are the questions that kept me enthralled.

While the themes explored are certainly not new, they embrace issues the reader can connect with at any age. And though the issues are intense ones, it is not an intense read. In fact, there is much joy and beauty between the pages.

Read more about State of Grace on the Goodreads page.